SHANGHAI INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT

SHANGHAI INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT

The very modern Shanghai International Circuit was designed by Hermann Tilke and features one of the longest straights on the calendar and a wide range of corners from tight ones to wide radius turns, making it fun for drivers and spectators alike.

The track layout represents the shape of the Chinese “Shang” character, which translates as “above,” while the paddock buildings resemble the Yuyan Garden, with many other details reflecting Chinese culture.

Features of the Shanghai Circuit

The track is 5.4 kilometres in length and features 16 corners. The first sector is the most demanding, starting with a never-ending right hander, which continues to turn in on itself. After the start, the tortuous nature of this section means the cars are all bunched up and the slightest distraction can trigger a collision.

Another very unusual corner is Turn 13, which leads onto the kilometre-plus straight; a fast right-hander which is slightly banked and which subjects the tyres to heavy lateral loads.

The Shanghai circuit is not particularly hard on brakes, although the most critical point on the track is definitely Turn 14 at the end of the very long straight, which subjects drivers to a deceleration force of 4.9G. Generally, the cars run a lot of aero downforce, so drag adds to the braking effect, thus lessening the strain on the brakes.

With six wins to his name, Lewis Hamilton has the most wins at the Shanghai International Circuit, with Mercedes also boasting five victories in the Chinese Grand Prix to date.

FIRST GRAND PRIX
2004
NUMBER OF LAPS
56
CIRCUIT LENGTH
5.451km
RACE DISTANCE
305.066 km
LAP RECORD
1:32.238 Michael Schumacher (2004)